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Field Excursions

The conference organisers offer two post-conference field excursions, excursions 1 and 2, both to take place Friday 2 June 2017. If you wish to participate, you can indicate this in the registration form. If the excursion of your choice will not take place (e.g. because of not enough participants), you can also indicate on the registration form whether you wish to take part in the other excursion, instead of in the excursion of your original choice.

As of Thursday 23 February 15:00:
Excursion 2 is now fully booked, therefore Excursion 2 is not available anymore in the registration form. If you have any questions please contact the organisers.

Field excursion 1

(a) Visit to a bulb farm (agriculture related problems in flower bulb growing district, measures to reduce spread of pesticides to groundwater and surface water), (b) Amsterdam Water Supply Dunes (area used by Waternet company to produce drinking water), and (c) city of Amsterdam

This excursion will start in the flower-growing area called the Central Bulb District, the oldest and most well-known production area between Leiden and Haarlem. In this area already for centuries tulips, hyacinths and other bulbous crops are grown in the coastal, sandy soils. The Dutch flower bulb industry faces several environmental challenges on the use of pesticides and nutrients. The Royal General Bulb Growers' Association (KAVB) initiated a programme to reduce of the spread of pesticides and nutrients to groundwater and surface water.

One of the projects the KAVB has started is ‘Clean Yard, Clean Ditch’ (in Dutch: Schoon erf, schone sloot) in which growers participate for a period of 2 years. In the first year during planting season in autumn, waste water from the farm yard pit is sampled on pesticides. With the test results, the grower checks on the possible routes pesticides could be spread or leaked. After this, measures are introduced to prevent the spread of pesticides. In the second sampling round, the effectiveness of the taken measures is determined. The Waterboard (regional water authority) monitors the water quality of surface water in the area of the farms. During the visit the owner of the bulb farm will show some measures that are taken and we will discuss the effects on pesticides in waste water and surface water.

Hereafter the trip leads to the Amsterdam Water Supply Dunes, the area used by the Waternet company to produce drinking water. Waternet is the merged organisation of the Waterboard Amstel, Gooi & Vecht, the Service for Surface Water and Sewerage Management of the City of Amsterdam, and the Amsterdam Water Supply. It is the first and only public organisation in the Netherlands that manages the complete cycle of surface water, groundwater, drinking water, the sewerage system and wastewater.

This dune area south of the city Zandvoort is one of the largest nature reserves along the Dutch coast, comprising 3,400 hectares with a rich flora and fauna and various types of landscapes. The area stretches 8 kilometres along the Dutch North Sea coast with a width varying from 1.5 to 5 kilometres. We will make a bike tour through the area, bicycles to be supplied for us. For non-bikers a limited number of seats in a mini-van is available.

The Amsterdam Water Supply Dunes are used for the production of drinking water, largely originating from water from the Rhine River. Pre-treated (filtered) river water is transported by a system of channels to 40 open ponds, where it infiltrates into the sandy subsurface. After an average of about 90 days of slow seepage through the shallow aquifer it is recovered by drains and open canals and transported through those canals to the treatment plant. In a few purification steps it is transformed to potable water.

In the afternoon the excursion continues to Amsterdam, the capital of the Netherlands. From its earliest days, Amsterdam has been a bustling hub of commerce that welcomed other cultures with open arms. A guided cruise through the Amsterdam canals will learn you more about this lovely city, including its long and eventful history and backgrounds of the Dutch pragmatic tolerance.

Start of excursion: 8:00
Return to The Hague:
expected between 18:00 and 19:00 
Price: €85

Suggested reading:
http://www.kavb.nl/english/organisation
https://www.waterinnovatieprijs.nl/project/schoon-erf-schone-sloot/ (website in Dutch)
https://www.waternet.nl/about-us (Waternet, water company for Amsterdam and surroundings)
https://awd.waternet.nl/kaart/#!/ (map of Amsterdam Water Supply Dunes)
http://www.dutchamsterdam.nl/171-why-is-amsterdam-so-tolerant

 

Field excursion 2

a) Biological Dairy Farm ‘Achtervennen’ in Ilpendam, about farm management in a wet peat area; (b) guided boat tour through the municipality Waterland (nature and agriculture in a typical Dutch landscape of pasture on peat soils), and (c) city of Amsterdam

This trip will lead us to several small picturesque towns in the municipality of Waterland (located north of Amsterdam, on the western shore of the Markermeer Lake), and through its ‘veenweidegebied’, a typical Dutch landscape of pasture on peat soils.

From the 10th century onwards, locals started collecting peat for fuel and dewatering the peat soil area. At first, the ground level of the peat areas was much higher than the groundwater level. Because of the lowering groundwater table, a lot of the organic matter in the peat soils oxidised, so that after several centuries the ground level was almost at the same level as the groundwater level. The area became again too wet for arable farming. Since then it is used as pasture for livestock, especially dairy farming. Because of the ongoing subsidence, dams and dikes, and a continuous management of the water level, protect the land. As you will see, the water in some of the canals and rivers is higher than the surrounding land.

This excursion will start at the dairy farm ‘Achtervennen’ in the village Ilpendam, where a farmer will show us around on his biological farm. This farmer is also the chairman of the local farmers network for nature management.

Next, the trip leads to the small village Zuiderwoude, also in the municipality of Waterland, from where a guide from Staatsbosbeheer (a public organisation commissioned by the Dutch government to manage a sizeable amount of the nature reserves in the Netherlands), will take us on a boat tour through the ‘veenweidegebied’. We will have lunch in the restaurant Schoolhuis in the small village of Holysloot, and travel back by boat to Zuiderwoude.

In the afternoon, the excursion continues to Amsterdam, the capital of the Netherlands. From its earliest days, Amsterdam has been a bustling hub of commerce that welcomed other cultures with open arms. A guided cruise through the Amsterdam canals will learn you more about this lovely city, including its long and eventful history and backgrounds of the Dutch pragmatic tolerance.

Start of excursion: 8:00
Return to The Hague: expected between 18:00 and 19:00 
Price: €85

Suggested reading:
www.waterlandendijken.nl (website in Dutch)
http://www.iamsterdam.com/en/visiting/areas/city-escapes/old-holland/amsterdam-waterland 
https://www.staatsbosbeheer.nl/english
www.schoolhuisholysloot.nl (website in Dutch)
http://www.dutchamsterdam.nl/171-why-is-amsterdam-so-tolerant
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Klinkhamer Group | meeting services
P.O. Box 1308
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The Netherlands

T +31 (0)43-36 27 008
helpdesk@klinkhamergroup.com

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